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Black Cohosh

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Black Cohosh - Cimifuga racemosa

Black cohosh has a history of use for rheumatism (arthritis and muscle pain) but has been used more recently to treat hot flashes, night sweats, vaginal dryness, and other symptoms that can occur during menopause.

Worldwide, Black Cohosh is now one of the leading herbs for women seeking effective, alternative support for feminine health. The growing body of evidence shows its powerful phytoestrogens ease the distressing physical and mild mood changes that accompany menopause, as well as promote hormonal balance throughout the menstrual cycle.

BLACK COHOSH Europe's most popular phytoestrogenic balancing tonic. Black cohosh is a popular herbal remedy for hot flashes, mood swings, and vaginal dryness of menopause.

Although it was long assumed that black cohosh’s effects were a result of weakly acting plant estrogens, or “phytoestrogens”, contained within the herb, researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago recently showed that black cohosh is not estrogenic whatsoever and most likely works by targeting receptors in the brain responsible for regulation of body temperature. This is good news for women who are concerned about their breast Health and are trying to minimize exposure to estrogens. In fact, laboratory studies indicate that black cohosh actually encourages growth of healthy breast tissue.

Black cohosh has a history of use for rheumatism (arthritis and muscle pain) but has been used more recently to treat hot flashes, night sweats, vaginal dryness, and other symptoms that can occur during menopause. Black cohosh has also been used for menstrual irregularities and premenstrual syndrome, and to induce labor.

The seeds are sent annually to Europe, and should be sown as soon as the season will permit. It flowers in June or early in July, but does not perfect seed in England, though it thrives well in moist shady borders and is perfectly hardy. It is a tall, herbaceous plant, with feathery racemes of white blossoms, 1 to 3 feet long, which being slender, droop gracefully. The fruits are dry. The plant produces a stout, blackish rhizome (creeping underground stem), cylindrical, hard and knotty, bearing the remains of numerous stout ascending branches. It is collected in the autumn after the fruit is formed and the leaves have died down, then cut into pieces and dried. It has only a faint, disagreeable odour, but a bitter and acrid taste. The straight, stout, dark brown roots which are given off from the under surface of the rhizome are bluntly quadrangular and furrowed. In the dried drug, they are brittle, broken off usually quite close to the rhizome. In transverse section, they show several wedge-shaped bundles of porous, whitish wood. A similar section of the rhizome shows a large dark-coloured, horny pith, surrounded by a ring of numerous pale wedges of wood, alternately with dark rays, outside which is a thin, dark, horny bark.

In menopausal women, black cohosh is not likely to cause any complications other than mild stomach upset. Black cohosh must be avoided during pregnancy because of its potential ability to stimulate uterine contractions.
This information is intended for educational and informational purposes only. It should not be used in place of an individual consultation or examination or replace the advice of your health care professional and should not be relied upon to determine diagnosis or course of treatment.