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Hyssop - Hyssopus officinalis

Hyssop is used in herbal medicine to move excesses of fluids or phlegm.

As a medicinal herb, hyssop has soothing, expectorant, and cough suppressant properties. The plant also includes the chemicals thujone and phenol, which give it antiseptic properties. Its high concentrations of thujone and chemicals that stimulate the central nervous system can provoke epileptic reactions when taken in high-enough doses.

Expectorant, diaphoretic, stimulant, pectoral, carminative. The healing virtues of the plant are due to a particular volatile oil, which is stimulative, carminative and sudorific. It admirably promotes expectoration, and in chronic catarrh its diaphoretic and stimulant properties combine to render it of especial value. It is usually given as a warm infusion, taken frequently and mixed with Horehound. Hyssop Tea is also a grateful drink, well adapted to improve the tone of a feeble stomach, being brewed with the green tops of the herb, which are sometimes boiled in soup to be given for asthma. In America, an infusion of the leaves is used externally for the relief of muscular rheumatism, and also for bruises and discoloured contusions, and the green herb, bruised and applied, will heal cuts promptly.

Hyssop Oil has a camphor odor with sweet, spicy undertones. This oil helps support healthy respiratory, reproductive, nervous and circulatory systems.

Hyssop is considered one of the strongest anti-viral essential oils. It contains natural molecules from nearly every class of compounds found in therapeutic essential oils, yet it is still quite gentle. It is one of the oils recommended for treatment of herpes simplex, and can work effectively for many other viral infections. It may be used from a nebulizing diffuser, or on the accupressure/reflexology points of the feet associated with the illness.

Hyssop oil's primary use in aromatherapy has been for respiratory and digestive complaints, and externally for rheumatism, bruises, sores, earache and toothache. It has also been used to regulate blood pressure and as a general nerve tonic relieving states of anxiety or hysteria. Hyssop is listed in the current British Herbal Pharmacopoeia for bronchitis and the common cold.

Hyssop has been in use since Classical antiquity. Its name is a direct adaptation from the Greek υσσοπος, which in term developed from the Hebrew esob. The plant is mentioned as an aromatic herb in the Hebrew Tanakh and the Gospel of John. In the gospel, the Roman legionaries guarding the cross of Jesus Christ offer him a sponge soaked in vinegar by placing it on a sprig of hyssop and extending it.

Hyssop is cultivated for the use of its flower-tops, which are steeped in water to make an infusion, which is sometimes employed as an expectorant. There are three varieties, known respectively by their blue, red and white flowers, which are in bloom from June to October, and are sometimes employed as edging plants. Grown with catmint, it makes a lovely border, backed with Lavender and Rosemary. As a kitchen herb, it is mostly used for broths and decoctions, occasionally for salad. For medicinal use the flower-tops should be cut in August.

Not recommended while pregnant.
This information is intended for educational and informational purposes only. It should not be used in place of an individual consultation or examination or replace the advice of your health care professional and should not be relied upon to determine diagnosis or course of treatment.