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Raspberry Leaf - Rubus idaeus

Raspberry leaves have been used for centuries as a folk medicine to treat canker sores, cold sores, and gingivitis in persons of all ages as well as to treat anemia, leg cramps, diarrhea, and morning sickness in pregnant women, and as a uterine relaxant.

Herbalists praise Red Raspberry as one of nature’s ultimate gift to women. Why? For centuries, the renowned female tonic has provided effective support throughout all stages of a woman’s life- from menstrual to menopausal health. Red Raspberry also has a long history of use by traditional midwives and women seeking a gentle alternative for strengthening and maintaining overall reproductive health. In addition, the herb is a valuable storehouse of the key nutrients that positively affect women’s health, including calcium, iron, and vitamin E. It offers nutritional support for pre-menstrual needs, supports a smooth female cycle, and gently calms morning sickness associated with pregnancy.

Astringent and stimulant. Raspberry Leaf Tea, made by the infusion of 1 OZ. of the dried leaves in a pint of boiling water, is employed as a gargle for sore mouths, canker of the throat, and as a wash for wounds and ulcers. The leaves, combined with the powdered bark of Slippery Elm, make a good poultice for cleansing wounds, burns and scalds, removing proud flesh and promoting healing.

An infusion of Raspberry leaves, taken cold, is a reliable remedy for extreme laxity of the bowels. The infusion alone, or as a component part of injections, never fails to give immediate relief. It is useful in stomach complaints of children.

A study published in the Journal of Midwifery and Women's Health in 2001 found that women who drank raspberry leaf tea had shorter labor, and fewer of their babies were delivered by forceps. Another study, published in the Australian College of Midwives Journal, cited in The Natural Pharmacist stated: "The findings also suggest ingestion of the drug might decrease the likelihood of pre and post-term gestation. An unexpected finding in this study seems to indicate that women who ingest raspberry leaf might be less likely to receive an artificial rupture of their membranes, or require a caesarean section, forceps or vacuum birth than the women in the control group."

It is a perennial plant which bears biennial stems ("canes") from the perennial root system. In its first year, a new stem grows vigorously to its full height of 1.5-2.5 m, unbranched, and bearing large pinnate leaves with five or seven leaflets; normally it does not produce any flowers. In its second year, the stem does not grow taller, but produces several side shoots, which bear smaller leaves with three or five leaflets. The flowers are produced in late spring on short racemes on the tips of these side shoots, each flower about 1 cm diameter with five white petals. The fruit is red, edible, sweet but tart-flavoured, produced in summer or early autumn; in botanical terminology, it is not a berry at all, but an aggregate fruit of numerous drupelets around a central core. In raspberry, as in other species of the subgenus Idaeobatus, the drupelets separate from the core when picked, leaving a hollow fruit, whereas in blackberry the drupelets stay attached to the core.

Safe dosages for children under the age of 6 and for persons with liver or kidney disease have not been established. It is strongly recommended that women choosing to use Red Raspberry during pregnancy do so only under the care and supervision of an exper
This information is intended for educational and informational purposes only. It should not be used in place of an individual consultation or examination or replace the advice of your health care professional and should not be relied upon to determine diagnosis or course of treatment.