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Thyme - Thymus vulgaris

Throughout the years, Thyme has indeed proved to be an effective herbal support for respiratory and digestive functions. European herbal medicine texts recognize Thyme for soothing the bronchial and upper respiratory system.

Thyme is a strong antiseptic used externally for infected cuts and scrapes and infernally for oral and respiratory infections. Oil of thyme is the main ingredient in the mouthwash Listerine. Bath washes made from teas of thyme allowed to cool treat fungal infections such as athlete's foot and also vaginal yeast infections. Thyme contains tannins that cause proteins in skin to cross-link, forming a barrier to infection.

In 1725 a German apothecary discovered that the plant's essential oil contains a powerful disinfectant called thymol that is effective against bacteria and fungi. Thymol also acts as a expectorant, loosening phlegm in the respiratory tract so that it can be coughed up. Later herbalists listed thyme for these uses and as remedy for numerous other complaints, including diarrhoea and fever. They prescribed the oil externally as an antiseptic for fungal infections such as athlete's foot. Thymol is a powerful antiseptic for both internal and external use; it is also employed as a Deodorant and local anaesthetic. It is extensively used to medicate gauze and wool for surgical dressings. It resembles carbolic acid in its action, but is less irritant to wounds, while its germicidal action is greater. It is therefore preferable as a dressing and during recent years has been one of the most extensively used antiseptics.

The pounded herb, if given fresh, from 1 to 6 OZ. daily, mixed with syrup, has been employed with success as a safe cure for whooping cough. An infusion made from 1 OZ. of the dried herb to 1 pint of boiling water, sweetened with sugar or honey, is also used for the same purpose, as well as in cases of catarrh and sore throat, given in doses of 1 or more tablespoonsful, several times daily. The wild plant may be equally well used for this.

No one should take thyme oil internally. Women who are pregnant should not drink thyme tea, although small amounts of thyme used in cooking do not cause side effects. Do not take thyme as a medicine if you have a duodenal ulcer or if you have thyroid dise
This information is intended for educational and informational purposes only. It should not be used in place of an individual consultation or examination or replace the advice of your health care professional and should not be relied upon to determine diagnosis or course of treatment.