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Turmeric - Curcuma longa

Turmeric promotes joint function & mobility, supports healthy inflammatory response and offers potent antioxidant defense.

Research around the world and even here in the United States, are currently focusing on Turmeric's positive influence on the body's inflammatory response, especially in the areas of joint and gastrointestinal health. Turmeric in the diet may prevent pain of arthritis, bursitis, and tendonitis. A volatile oil in the spice is as effective in relieving pain, under laboratory conditions, as equal amounts steroids.

Turmeric is currently being investigated for possible benefits in Alzheimer's disease, cancer, arthritis, and other clinical disorders.

In India's system of Ayurvedic medicine, turmeric has been recognized for thousands of years as a key balancing and detoxifying herb. In Indonesia's traditional medical system known as Jamu, turmeric is considered the "Queen" of all herbs, and is the featured daily herb for tens of millions of Indonesians. In Japan and China, people embrace turmeric for its powerful yet safe liver detoxification, and there are societies in Japan where turmeric juice is consumed daily. In the Western medical and herbal traditions, turmeric is considered by many leading scholars to be the most important healing herb on earth.

In Ayurvedic practices, turmeric has many medicinal properties and many in South Asia use it as a readily available antiseptic for cuts, burns and bruises. It is also used as an antibacterial agent. It is taken in some Asian countries as a dietary supplement, which allegedly helps with stomach problems and other ailments. It is popular as a tea in Okinawa, Japan. Pakistanis also use it as an anti-inflammatory agent, and remedy for gastrointestinal discomfort associated with irritable bowel syndrome, and other digestive disorders. In Afghanistan and northwest Pakistan, turmeric is applied to a piece of burnt cloth, and placed over a wound to Cleanse and stimulate recovery. Indians, in addition to its Ayurvedic properties, use turmeric in a wide variety of skin creams that are also exported to neighboring countries.

A perennial plant with roots or tubers oblong, palmate, and deep orange inside; root-leaves about 2 feet long, lanceolate, long, petioled, tapering at each end, smooth, of a uniform green; petioles sheathing spike, erect, central, oblong, green; flowers dull yellow, three or five together surrounded by bracteolae. It is propagated by cuttings from the root, which when dry is in curved cylindrical or oblong tubers 2 or 3 inches in length, and an inch in diameter, pointed or tapering at one end, yellowish externally, with transverse, parallel rings internally deep orange or reddish brown, marked with shining points, dense, solid, short, granular fracture, forming a lemon yellow powder. It has a peculiar fragrant odour and a bitterish, slightly acrid taste, like ginger, exciting warmth in the mouth and colouring the saliva yellow. It yields its properties to water or alcohol.

As is the case with so many herbs, turmeric should be used in moderation. Too much turmeric for too long can cause stomach distress. Since turmeric is included in Ayurvedic formulas for birth control, women trying to become pregnant should limit their con
This information is intended for educational and informational purposes only. It should not be used in place of an individual consultation or examination or replace the advice of your health care professional and should not be relied upon to determine diagnosis or course of treatment.